Serving the Inland Empire since 1990

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Get a free consultation to STOP collections and get a fresh start!

S tart today to receive a free consultation.  Evaluate your situation, and understand how Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy laws will impact your debt and life.

A recently relieved client said “Because he cares and can help you take the first step to get out of foreclosure or debt without sacrificing your home or future.” Paul understands the difficult financial situations we face today due to the economy and lack of work. He knows his way around the Southern California Court System; he has lived and practiced law here since 1990, delivering honest and professional bankruptcy assistance to the people of Claremont California and the surrounding areas for over 20 years. Paul has admission to the bar to practice law in the United States District Court for Central, Eastern and Southern California, Ninth Circuit United States Court of Appeals, and the United States Supreme Court.

There is a way out, Call Now! For a FREE Consultation, my rates are very competitive and reasonable.

  • Are you frequently late in paying your bills?
  • Are you behind on your mortgage payments?
  • Are you being
    threatened with foreclosure?
  • Has your income decreased in the past six months?
  • Have your wages been garnished in the last year?
  • Do you owe any back taxes?
  • Are you in credit card debt?
  • Has your car been repossessed in the last six months?
  • Are you getting harassment telephone calls from the collection agencies?
  • Do you have a lawsuit against you?
  • If “yes” to any of these questions, then call me and we can determine whether Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the right course for you.

    There are many reasons why people choose Chapter 13 bankruptcy instead of Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Generally, you are probably a good candidate for Chapter 13 bankruptcy if you are in any of the following situations:

    1. You have a sincere desire to repay your debts, but you need the protection of the bankruptcy court to do so. You may think filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy is simply the “Right Thing to Do” rather than file Chapter 7.

    2. You are behind on your mortgage payments or car loan, and want to make up the missed payments over time and reinstate the original agreement. You cannot do this in Chapter 7 bankruptcy. You can make up missed payments only in Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

    3. You need help repaying your debts now, but need to leave open the option of filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in the future. This would be the case if for some reason you can’t stop incurring new debt.

    4. You are a family farmer who wants to pay off your debts, but you do not qualify for a Chapter 12 family farming bankruptcy because you have a large debt unrelated to farming.

    5. You have valuable non-exempt property. When you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you get to keep certain property, called exempt. If you have a lot of non-exempt property which you’d have to give up if you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be the better option.

    6. You filed a Chapter 7 bankruptcy within the previous eight years. You cannot file for Chapter 7 again until the eight years are up.


    Bankruptcy – A legal procedure for dealing with debt problems of individuals and businesses; specifically, a case filed under one of the chapters of title 11 of the United States Code (the Bankruptcy Code).

    Bankruptcy code – The informal name for title 11 of the United States Code (11 U.S.C. §§ 101-1330), the federal bankruptcy law.

    Bankruptcy court – The bankruptcy judges in regular active service in each district; a unit of the district court.

    Bankruptcy estate – All interests of the debtor in property at the time of the bankruptcy filing. The estate technically becomes the temporary legal owner of all of the debtor’s property.

    Bankruptcy judge – A judicial officer of the United States district court who is the court official with decision-making power over federal bankruptcy cases.

    Bankruptcy petition – A formal request for the protection of the federal bankruptcy laws. (There is an official form for bankruptcy petitions.)

    Bankruptcy trustee – A private individual or corporation appointed in all Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 cases to represent the interests of the bankruptcy estate and the debtor’s creditors.

    341 meeting – In a bankruptcy proceeding, a meeting of creditors at which the debtor is questioned under oath by creditors, a trustee, an examiner, or the U.S. Trustee about his or her financial affairs.

    Adversary proceeding – A lawsuit arising in or related to a bankruptcy case that begins by filing a complaint with the court, that is, a “trial” that takes place within the context of a bankruptcy case.
    Automatic stay – An injunction that automatically stops lawsuits, foreclosure, garnishments, and most collection activity against the debtor the moment a bankruptcy petition is filed.

    Business bankruptcy – A bankruptcy case in which the debtor is a business or an individual involved in business and the debts are for business purposes.

    Chapter 7 – The chapter of the Bankruptcy Code providing for “liquidation,” that is, the sale of a debtor’s nonexempt property and the distribution of the proceeds to creditors. In order to be eligible for Chapter 7, the debtor must satisfy a “means test.” The court will evaluate the debtor’s income and expenses to determine if the debtor may proceed under Chapter 7.

    Chapter 7 trustee – A person appointed in a Chapter 7 case to represent the interests of the bankruptcy estate and the creditors. The trustee’s responsibilities include reviewing the debtor’s petition and schedules, liquidating the property of the estate, and making distributions to creditors. The trustee may also bring actions against creditors or the debtor to recover property of the bankruptcy estate.

    Chapter 13 – The chapter of the Bankruptcy Code providing for adjustment of debts of an individual with regular income, often referred to as a “wage-earner” plan. Chapter 13 allows a debtor to keep property and use his or her disposable income to pay debts over time, usually three to five years.

    Chapter 13 trustee – A person appointed to administer a Chapter 13 case. A Chapter 13 trustee’s responsibilities are similar to those of a Chapter 7 trustee; however, a Chapter 13 trustee has the additional responsibilities of overseeing the debtor’s plan, receiving payments from debtors, and disbursing plan payments to creditors.

    Confirmation – Approval of a plan of reorganization by a bankruptcy judge.

    Consumer bankruptcy – A bankruptcy case filed to reduce or eliminate debts that are primarily consumer debts.

    Credit counseling – Generally refers to two events in individual bankruptcy cases: (1) the “individual or group briefing” from a nonprofit budget and credit counseling agency that individual debtors must attend prior to filing under any chapter of the Bankruptcy Code; and (2) the “instructional course in personal financial management” in chapters 7 and 13 that an individual debtor must complete before a discharge is entered. There are exceptions to both requirements for certain categories of debtors, exigent circumstances, or if the U.S. trustee or bankruptcy administrator has determined that there are insufficient approved credit counseling agencies available to provide the necessary counseling.

    Debtor – A person who has filed a petition for relief under the Bankruptcy Code. Defendant an individual (or business) against which a lawsuit is filed.

    Dischargeable debt – A debt for which the Bankruptcy Code allows the debtor’s personal liability to be eliminated.

    Exemptions, exempt property – Certain property owned by an individual debtor that the Bankruptcy Code or applicable state law permits the debtor to keep from unsecured creditors. For example, in some states the debtor may be able to exempt all or a portion of the equity in the debtor’s primary residence (homestead exemption), or some or all “tools of the trade” used by the debtor to make a living (i.e., auto tools for an auto mechanic or dental tools for a dentist). The availability and amount of property the debtor may exempt depends on the state the debtor lives in.

    Face sheet filing – A bankruptcy case filed either without schedules or with incomplete schedules listing few creditors and debts. (Face sheet filings are often made for the purpose of delaying an eviction or foreclosure.)

    Fresh start – The characterization of a debtor’s status after bankruptcy, i.e., free of most debts. (Giving debtors a fresh start is one purpose of the Bankruptcy Code.)

    Joint petition – One bankruptcy petition filed by a husband and wife together.

    Means test – Section 707(b)(2) of the Bankruptcy Code applies a “means test” to determine whether an individual debtor’s chapter 7 filing is presumed to be an abuse of the Bankruptcy Code requiring dismissal or conversion of the case (generally to chapter 13). Abuse is presumed if the debtor’s aggregate current monthly income (see definition above) over 5 years, net of certain statutorily allowed expenses is more than (i) $10,000, or (ii) 25% of the debtor’s nonpriority unsecured debt, as long as that amount is at least $6,000. The debtor may rebut a presumption of abuse only by a showing of special circumstances that justify additional expenses or adjustments of current monthly income.

    No-asset case – A Chapter 7 case in which there are no assets available to satisfy any portion of the creditors’ unsecured claims.

    Non dischargeable debt – A debt that cannot be eliminated in bankruptcy. Examples include a home mortgage, debts for alimony or child support, certain taxes, debts for most government funded or guaranteed educational loans or benefit overpayments, debts arising from death or personal injury caused by driving while intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, and debts for restitution or a criminal fine included in a sentence on the debtor’s conviction of a crime. Some debts, such as debts for money or property obtained by false pretenses and debts for fraud or defalcation while acting in a fiduciary capacity may be declared non dischargeable only if a creditor timely files and prevails in a non discharge ability action.

    Party in interest – A party who has standing to be heard by the court in a matter to be decided in the bankruptcy case. The debtor, the U.S. trustee or bankruptcy administrator, the case trustee and creditors are parties in interest for most matters.

    Petition preparer – A business not authorized to practice law that prepares bankruptcy petitions.

    Petition – The document that initiates the filing of a bankruptcy proceeding, setting forth basic information regarding the debtor, including name, address, chapter under which the case is filed, and estimated amount of assets and liabilities.

    Pre-bankruptcy planning – The arrangement (or rearrangement) of a debtor’s property to allow the debtor to take maximum advantage of exemptions. (Pre- bankruptcy planning typically includes converting nonexempt assets into exempt assets.)

    Preferential debt payment – A debt payment made to a creditor in the 90-day period before a debtor files bankruptcy (or within one year if the creditor was an insider) that gives the creditor more than the creditor would receive in the debtor’s chapter 7 case.

    Priority – The Bankruptcy Code’s statutory ranking of unsecured claims that determines the order in which unsecured claims will be paid if there is not enough money to pay all unsecured claims in full.

    Procedure – The rules for conducting a lawsuit; there are rules of civil procedure, criminal procedure, evidence, bankruptcy, and appellate procedure.

    Reaffirmation agreement – An agreement by a debtor to continue paying a dischargeable debt after the bankruptcy, usually for the purpose of keeping collateral or mortgaged property that would otherwise be subject to repossession.

    Redemption – A procedure in a Chapter 7 case whereby a debtor removes a secured creditor’s lien on collateral by paying the creditor the value of the property. The debtor may then retain the property.

    Statement of intention – A declaration made by a chapter 7 debtor concerning plans for dealing with consumer debts that are secured by property of the estate.

    Substantial abuse – The characterization of a bankruptcy case filed by an individual whose debts are primarily consumer debts where the court finds that the granting of relief would be an abuse of chapter 7 because, for example, the debtor can pay its debts.

    Trustee – The representative of the bankruptcy estate who exercises statutory powers, principally for the benefit of the unsecured creditors, under the general supervision of the court and the direct supervision of the U.S. trustee or bankruptcy administrator. The trustee is a private individual or corporation appointed in all chapter 7, chapter 12, and chapter 13 cases and some chapter 11 cases. The trustee’s responsibilities include reviewing the debtor’s petition and schedules and bringing actions against creditors or the debtor to recover property of the bankruptcy estate. In chapter 7, the trustee liquidates property of the estate, and makes distributions to creditors. Trustees in chapter 12 and 13 have similar duties to a chapter 7 trustee and the additional responsibilities of overseeing the debtor’s plan, receiving payments from debtors, and disbursing plan payments to creditors.